Agency MARC USA has created a sizzling - and somewhat disturbing - campaign for The Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh for its series of summer exhibitions. Agency MARC USA has created a sizzling - and somewhat disturbing - campaign for The Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh for its series of summer exhibitions. Agency MARC USA has created a sizzling - and somewhat disturbing - campaign for The Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh for its series of summer exhibitions.

Agency MARC USA has created a sizzling - and somewhat disturbing - campaign for The Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh for its series of summer exhibitions.

Delfina Delettrez ‘Portraits’ brooch

Alessandro Giaco Alessandro Giaco

Alessandro Giaco

Chromosaturation - Interactive light installation by artist Carlos Cruz Diez Chromosaturation - Interactive light installation by artist Carlos Cruz Diez Chromosaturation - Interactive light installation by artist Carlos Cruz Diez Chromosaturation - Interactive light installation by artist Carlos Cruz Diez

Chromosaturation - Interactive light installation by artist Carlos Cruz Diez

Delfina Delettrez  
Loving her experimental approach to jewelry design. Do check out her website : http://delfinadelettrez.com Delfina Delettrez  
Loving her experimental approach to jewelry design. Do check out her website : http://delfinadelettrez.com Delfina Delettrez  
Loving her experimental approach to jewelry design. Do check out her website : http://delfinadelettrez.com Delfina Delettrez  
Loving her experimental approach to jewelry design. Do check out her website : http://delfinadelettrez.com

Delfina Delettrez  

Loving her experimental approach to jewelry design. Do check out her website : http://delfinadelettrez.com

Daniel Rozin’s robotic “Mirrors”

Sexually suggestive cartoons from your childhood. Who would’ve thought!  Sexually suggestive cartoons from your childhood. Who would’ve thought!  Sexually suggestive cartoons from your childhood. Who would’ve thought!  Sexually suggestive cartoons from your childhood. Who would’ve thought! 

Sexually suggestive cartoons from your childhood. Who would’ve thought! 

David Bowie’s The stars (Are out tonight) video art direction is incredible. 

Inspired by these ideas of life, death, and rebirth, Japanese artist Mihoko Ogaki has created some amazing works. For the past few years she has created an ongoing series of sculptures that illuminate. The ongoing project is called “Milky Ways” and the pieces were just currently displayed at the MORI YU Gallery in Tokyo.
  Inspired by these ideas of life, death, and rebirth, Japanese artist Mihoko Ogaki has created some amazing works. For the past few years she has created an ongoing series of sculptures that illuminate. The ongoing project is called “Milky Ways” and the pieces were just currently displayed at the MORI YU Gallery in Tokyo.
  Inspired by these ideas of life, death, and rebirth, Japanese artist Mihoko Ogaki has created some amazing works. For the past few years she has created an ongoing series of sculptures that illuminate. The ongoing project is called “Milky Ways” and the pieces were just currently displayed at the MORI YU Gallery in Tokyo.
  Inspired by these ideas of life, death, and rebirth, Japanese artist Mihoko Ogaki has created some amazing works. For the past few years she has created an ongoing series of sculptures that illuminate. The ongoing project is called “Milky Ways” and the pieces were just currently displayed at the MORI YU Gallery in Tokyo.
 

Inspired by these ideas of life, death, and rebirth, Japanese artist Mihoko Ogaki has created some amazing works. For the past few years she has created an ongoing series of sculptures that illuminate. The ongoing project is called “Milky Ways” and the pieces were just currently displayed at the MORI YU Gallery in Tokyo.

 

Found primarily in Colombia and Ecuador, Dracula simia (aka “Monkey Orchid”) is a species of orchid that resemble little monkey faces.

What came before Photoshop
The term “Photoshopping” has these days become synonymous with photo manipulation. But the practice is much older than the computer software — about as old as photography itself. An exhibition now on display at Washington, D.C.’s National Gallery of Art is exploring just that: The collaging, cutting, pasting and coloring that preceded digital photography. What came before Photoshop
The term “Photoshopping” has these days become synonymous with photo manipulation. But the practice is much older than the computer software — about as old as photography itself. An exhibition now on display at Washington, D.C.’s National Gallery of Art is exploring just that: The collaging, cutting, pasting and coloring that preceded digital photography. What came before Photoshop
The term “Photoshopping” has these days become synonymous with photo manipulation. But the practice is much older than the computer software — about as old as photography itself. An exhibition now on display at Washington, D.C.’s National Gallery of Art is exploring just that: The collaging, cutting, pasting and coloring that preceded digital photography. What came before Photoshop
The term “Photoshopping” has these days become synonymous with photo manipulation. But the practice is much older than the computer software — about as old as photography itself. An exhibition now on display at Washington, D.C.’s National Gallery of Art is exploring just that: The collaging, cutting, pasting and coloring that preceded digital photography. What came before Photoshop
The term “Photoshopping” has these days become synonymous with photo manipulation. But the practice is much older than the computer software — about as old as photography itself. An exhibition now on display at Washington, D.C.’s National Gallery of Art is exploring just that: The collaging, cutting, pasting and coloring that preceded digital photography.

What came before Photoshop

The term “Photoshopping” has these days become synonymous with photo manipulation. But the practice is much older than the computer software — about as old as photography itself. An exhibition now on display at Washington, D.C.’s National Gallery of Art is exploring just that: The collaging, cutting, pasting and coloring that preceded digital photography.